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Frequently Asked Questions

Life Insurance

Why enroll into Term Life Insurance from us?
How can we offer these rates?
What are Ratings?
How do I get started?

Auto Insurance

Which coverages pay for damages to my vehicle?
How do I deal with another driver's insurer when a crash is not my fault?

Homeowners Insurance

What coverages are in a standard homeowners insurance policy?
Why do I need Homeowner's Insurance?
How can I get a quote?

Annuities Glossary

The Basics Of Annuities

Life Term Care

What is Long-Term Care?
Who Needs Long-Term Care?
What Are My Risks of Needing Long-Term Care?
How Much Care Might I Need?
How Do Care Needs Change Over Time?


Why Term Life Insurance from us?
We offer a selection of top quality, customized insurance plans from a highly-rated insurance company that are competitively priced and easy to apply for right from your house. Our representatives are licensed life insurance experts, who provide all customers with the honest answers and personal service they need to make informed decisions.

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How can we offer these rates?
The plans that you can quote, apply, and gain coverage from now, have been specifically designed to cut the time and paperwork associated with insurance processing. We have attributed an approximate savings that cost most consumers 30%-40% of the premium costs.

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What are ratings?
Independent agencies such as A.M. Best issue ratings on insurance companies for the benefit of consumers, investors, and the insurance industry itself. Agencies assess the insurance company's ability to pay claims through close scrutiny of the insurance company's operations and plans as well as using publicly available information. Agencies use a number of assessment criteria including financial strength, capital resources, stability of cash flow, and demonstrated management performance. Other important factors include quality of administration, marketing, and investment operations.

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How I get started?
We make finding the right policy to meet your needs simple. Call us toll-free or request a quote online. Our licensed insurance experts will help you, and answer your questions to find the term life coverage you need at an affordable price. Once you have found your quote, simply APPLY ONLINE. In about 20 minutes you will know if you're covered. It is as simple as that. We take care of all the details, Period. You don't have to worry about anything involved in the application process, we even arrange for the required medical exam at no cost to you! Our goal? Happy Customers. If you like our service, you may know someone else who might too.

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Which coverages pay for damages to my vehicle?
If you're at fault in an accident (whether you've crashed into someone else or into a fence), you'll need collision coverage if you want your repairs covered. If you don't have collision coverage, you'll need to pay for repairs out of your own pocket. Some drivers drop collision coverage when their cars get older because the potential cost of fixing them is more than the value of the cars.

If someone else crashes into you, their liability insurance must pay for repairs to your vehicle. This is called a "third-party" claim because you're making a claim on their insurance.

If you live in a "no-fault" state, you always make a claim on your own policy no matter who is at fault.

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How do I deal with another driver's insurer when a crash is not my fault?
Doing business with your own insurance company after a car crash can be time-consuming and a hassle. Just imagine what it's like to deal with the insurance company of someone else who crashed into your car. Here are some tips to ensure you maintain your cool - and your sanity - when making a claim with the at-fault person's insurer.

The driver who crashes into your car is responsible for informing his or her insurance company about the incident. However, it's a good idea for you to call his or her insurer because motorists who cause accidents often may be reluctant reporters. So, it is important that you obtain the most complete insurance information from the at-fault person at the scene of the accident: insurance company name, claims phone number, address, and even the insurance agent's name.

The at-fault person's auto insurer is responsible for paying you for your damages and injuries. You then inform the other person's insurer that you have been involved in a crash with one of its policyholders and tell it about any property damages or injuries. Also, relate only the facts of the accident to the insurer, even if you believe the other driver to be at fault. The police will determine who is at fault and the insurer will make its determination of fault based on the police recommendation, your commentary notwithstanding.

Although you may feel you are not at fault in the accident, you should contact your own insurance company. This is crucial because it establishes your good-faith accident-reporting effort and, more importantly, can aid you if the other party and/or his or her insurer deny responsibility for the accident.

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What coverages are in a standard homeowners insurance policy?

Coverages for the structure of your home, your personal belongings and liability protection are included in a basic homeowners insurance policy.

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Why do I need Homeowner's Insurance?

Homeowners Insurance enables you to protect your home from damage and destruction which could arise out of accidents or natural disasters. Secondly, mortgage lenders require you to get covered to protect their investment from damage or loss.

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How can I get a quote?

The fastest and easiest way is to request for a quote online. You can go to our Homeowner's Insurance page for more information.

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Annuities Glossary

Accumulation phase. We offer a selection of top quality, customized insurance plans from a highly-rated insurance company that are competitively priced and easy to apply for right from your house. Our representatives are licensed life insurance experts, who provide all customers with the honest answers and personal service they need to make informed decisions.

Annuitization phase. The phase in which you receive monthly payments from your annuity.

Basis points. The fees in your annuity. The number of basis points reflects a percentage of your investment. For example, 200 basis points would be 2 percent of your investment.

Death benefit. The amount of money your beneficiary receives if you die before you begin the annuitization phase. It is generally the value of your annuity or the amount you have invested, whichever sum is greater.

Mortality and expense (M&E). The fee the insurance company charges you to provide you with a lifetime income, and your beneficiaries with a death benefit should you die during the accumulation phase.

Non-qualified annuity. An annuity that is funded with after-tax dollars.

Qualified annuity. An annuity that is funded with pre-tax dollars.

Rider. A feature on your annuity that provides an additional benefit. For example, a long term care rider would cover nursing home costs. A bonus rider would give you an extra 1 to 5 percent of your investment upon buying the annuity.

Surrender. The act of getting out of your annuity. There is usually a fee if you surrender your annuity within the first seven or eight years of owning it. This fee is also known as a contingent deferred sales charge (CDSC) or a back-end sales load.

Tax deferral. The money that accumulates in your annuity grows tax-deferred, meaning you do not pay taxes on it until you begin receiving annuity payments. The death benefit on your annuity is also taxable to your beneficiary.

Term certain annuity. An annuity that provides you with income payments for a specific period of time, such as 10 or 20 years, rather than a lifetime

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The Basics Of Annuities

Dissecting how annuities work, whether you should buy one, and what kind to buy is no easy task. Here's how you can cut through the complexity of annuities to determine whether they are the right long-term product for you.

An annuity is a retirement-planning tool that has two phases: the accumulation phase and the annuitization phase. In the accumulation phase, you give money to an insurance or investment company over a period of time or in a lump sum, and it earns a rate of return. In the annuitization phase, you begin to withdraw regular payments (such as monthly or annually) from your contract until you die.

An annuity has a death benefit, although it is not like one found in a life insurance policy. If you die before you annuitize, your beneficiary will receive either the current value of your annuity or the amount you have paid into it, whichever is greater. For example, if you die when your investments are performing poorly and your account value is less than what you have paid in, your beneficiary would receive the amount you paid in.

Once you begin to receive monthly payments, you no longer have a death benefit on your contract. For example, if you annuitize at age 65 and die at age 67, the insurance company keeps the money in your contract. However, you can buy "term certain" annuities, which guarantee that either you or your beneficiary will receive payments for a certain period of time, such as 10 to 15 years. For example, if you died three years after you began receiving payments from a 10-year term certain annuity, your beneficiary would still receive payments for the next seven years.

The money in your annuity grows tax-deferred, meaning that the money is not taxable until you begin to receive payments from your annuity. Once you receive payments your gains are taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you die before you annuitize, your beneficiary pays taxes on the death benefit. In either case, the person who receives the money (the annuity holder or your beneficiary) is taxed at his or her ordinary income tax rate.

The ideal annuity buyer is 55 or older. Annuities are less attractive to younger investors because there is a 10 percent penalty tax if you withdraw money from your annuity before age 59 for reasons other than death or disability. However, many people who have already retired and need annuity income right away opt for immediate annuities, which skip the accumulation phase and begin to issue payments as soon as you invest in the contract.

The ideal annuity buyer is a person who has already contributed the maximum amount to their existing tax-deferred retirement plan, such as a 401(k), 403(b), or IRA. That's because you are already building up tax-deferred money in those plans, and the fees associated with those savings vehicles usually are much lower than those of annuities.

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What is Long-Term Care?

Long-term care is a variety of services and supports to meet health or personal care needs over an extended period of time. Most long-term care is non-skilled personal care assistance, such as help performing everyday Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), which are:

  • Bathing,
  • Dressing,
  • Using the toilet,
  • Transferring (to or from bed or chair),
  • Caring for incontinence, and
  • Eating.
The goal of long-term care services is to help you maximize your independence and functioning at a time when you are unable to be fully independent.

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Who Needs Long-Term Care?

Long-term care is needed when you have a chronic illness or disability that causes you to need assistance with Activities of Daily Living. Your illness or disability could include a problem with memory loss, confusion, or disorientation. (This is called Cognitive Impairment and can result from conditions such as Alzheimer's disease.)

This year, about 9 million Americans over the age of 65 will need long-term care services. By 2020, that number will increase to 12 million. While most people who need long-term care are age 65 or older, a person can need long-term care services at any age. Forty (40) percent of people currently receiving long-term care are adults 18 to 64 years old.

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What Are My Risks of Needing Long-Term Care?

About 70 percent of individuals over age 65 will require at least some type of long-term care services during their lifetime. Over 40 percent will need care in a nursing home for some period of time. Factors that increase your risk of needing long-term care are:

  • Age - The risk generally increases as you get older.
  • Marital Status - Single people are more likely to need care from a paid provider.
  • Gender - Women are at a higher risk than men, primarily because they tend to live longer.
  • Lifestyle - Poor diet and exercise habits can increase your risk.
  • Health and Family History - also impact your risk.

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How Much Care Might I Need?

It is difficult to predict how much or what type of care any one person might need. On average, someone age 65 today will need some long-term care services for three years. Service and support needs vary from one person to the next and often change over time. Women need care for longer (on average 3.7 years) than do men (on average 2.2 years). While about one-third of today's 65-year-olds may never need long-term care services, 20 percent of them will need care for more than five years.

If you need long-term care, you may need one or more of the following:
  • Care or assistance with activities of daily living in your home from an unpaid caregiver who can be a family member or friend;
  • Services at your home from a nurse, home health/home care aide, therapist, or homemaker;
  • Care in the community; and/or
  • Care in any of a variety of long-term facilities.
Generally, services provided by caregivers who are family or friends are unpaid. This is sometimes called informal care. Paid services are sometimes referred to as formal services. Paid services often supplement the services provided by family and friends.

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How Do Care Needs Change Over Time?

Many people who need long-term care develop the need for care gradually. They may begin needing care only a few times a week or one or two times a day, for example, help with bathing or dressing. Care needs often progress as you age or as your chronic illness or disability become more debilitating, causing you to need care on a more continual basis, for example help using the toilet or ongoing supervision because of a progressive condition such as Alzheimer's disease.

Some people need long-term care in a facility for a relatively short period of time while they are recovering from a sudden illness or injury, and then may be able to be cared for at home. Others may need long-term care services on an on-going basis, for example someone who is disabled from a severe stroke. Some people may need to move to a nursing home or other type of facility-based setting for more extensive care or supervision if their needs can no longer be met at home.

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